The Maasai People - Africa Snapshots - Art

The African Maasai People. - - No watermarks on the final Fine Art print. - - Amyn Nasser Studios http://amynnasser.com - - ImageLicensing: http://j.mp/imageBANK - - GalleryStock http://j.mp/gs-amynnasser - - Stockimo http://j.mp/stockimo-amyn - - Alamy http://bit.ly/alamy-amyn - - Pixels http://j.mp/pixels-nasser - - The Maasai (Kenyan English:[maˈsaːɪ]) are a Nilotic ethnic group inhabiting southern Kenya and northern Tanzania. Oxfam has claimed that the lifestyle of the Maasai should be embraced as a response to climate change. Settlement in East Africa The Maasai territory reached its largest size in the mid-19th century, and covered almost all of the Great Rift Valley and adjacent lands from Mount Marsabit in the north to Dodoma in the south. More land was taken to create wildlife reserves and national parks: Amboseli National Park, Nairobi National Park, Maasai Mara, Samburu National Reserve, Lake Nakuru National Park and Tsavo in Kenya; and Lake Manyara, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tarangire and Serengeti National Park in what is now Tanzania. The Maasai people stood against slavery and lived alongside most wild animals with an aversion to eating game and birds. Maasai land now has East Africa's finest game areas. Maasai society never condoned traffic of human beings, and outsiders looking for people to enslave avoided the Maasai. Essentially there are twelve geographic sectors of the tribe, each one having its own customs, appearance, leadership and dialects. These subdivisions are known as the Keekonyokie, Damat, Purko, Wuasinkishu, Siria, Laitayiok, Loitai, Kisonko, Matapato, Dalalekutuk, Loodokolani and Kaputiei.

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